To the 6 Plus and Back Again…

By now you’ve all read the countless reviews of the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus. Hell, you have probably even read reviews from people “one month in” to using their 6 Pluses. I know I have. I was lucky enough to snag a 6 Plus online on launch day and eagerly awaited everything about it. Yes, I was one of “those folks” that cut out the template of the form factor of the 6 Plus, taping it to a stack of index cards, carrying it in my front pocket for a week just to steel the confidence behind my purchase.

But there was no denying that, when it showed up at my front door, I laughed nervously thinking “Holy crap! This thing is HUGE!”. Not just bigger, or slightly over-sized – it was simply larger than I imagined – and that genuinely surprised me.

Like anything though, I thought I’d get used to it.

It fit in to all of my pants and jeans pockets relatively easily. Yes, it jabbed my hip when I sat down, but not in a remotely uncomfortable way and aside from that seemingly small quibble, there was a lot to like! I thoroughly enjoyed the larger screen! Reading/consuming on the 6 Plus was (and still is) one of the best iOS experiences I’ve had to date. In fact, the size got me using my iPad so infrequently (writing on the Plus was a joy by the way) that I almost considered it a more than capable replacement. I also really dug the creative use of the extra screen real estate in some apps when the 6 Plus was in landscape mode. Add in the battery life and the speed, and I actually can’t stress enough just how much of a joy it was to use this beautiful hardware.

Still, even with all of that, there was always something nagging at me.

Something about my new phone didn’t feel quite right. In hindsight, it was painfully obvious, but at the time I just plugged along and made do. Eventually though, the reason snuck up on me when I held a close friend’s iPhone 6 at a party: the 4.7 inch 6 just felt good in my hand. Not huge, not too small – not anything – it just felt right. Once he let me slip it into my pocket, that sealed the deal. It was official: I had bought the wrong phone for me.

The straw that broke the camel’s back was when I went hiking in Virginia with my wife. It was a beautiful Autumn day and I wanted to capture as much of it as I could. As I hiked along snapping pictures and the occasional slow-mo video of leaves falling to the ground, it finally hit me as to why I disliked my phone.

I was constantly aware of it.

All of the phones I’ve owned in the past slipped into my pocket, going completely unnoticed, until I either needed it for something or I had a call/text come in. Never before had I owned a phone that, through its sheer physical size, made me constantly aware that it was on my person. It was why I took it out in the car and put it in a cup holder while driving. Or why I would leave it on the dinner table when I was out to eat or sharing a meal with someone. Or why I’d leave it on the desk while I worked. Simply taking it out of my pocket wasn’t a solution either, because once on the table it is constantly within eye-shot; consciously or sub-consciously begging for your attention.

Therein lied the problem.

Sometimes I like, no… I need technology to disappear. The 6 Plus, for me anyways, couldn’t do that. For all of its virtues and its undeniable strengths, the Plus is just too big for me to incorporate into my day-to-day life.

Eventually I made it into the Apple store here in Durham where they took pity on me, allowing me to exchange my phone for the 4.7 inch iPhone 6 well outside of the 14 day return policy window. I slid it into my pocket and I’ve never looked back.

Where I really liked many aspects of the 6 Plus vert much, I love just about everything on this iPhone 6. Sure I miss the unique landscape layouts of some apps, the undeniable all-day battery life, and typing on the 6 is noticeably more cramped than on the plus… but everything else? It’s easily just as beautiful and more of a joy to use.

And, because it disappears into my pocket. I am back in love with having my iPhone with me.

Interesting Ideas: “Automatic – Your Smart Driving Assistant”

Automatic_Link_Car.58e119f5bc61

“Your Car and Smartphone, Connected

Just plug the Automatic Link into your car’s data port. Your car and smart phone
will automatically connect whenever you drive, wirelessly.”

This one has been making the rounds today and for good reason: there are so many awesome ideas at play here! Basically, “Automatic” is a hardware and iOS/Android software solution that connects to your smart phone to your car in a really ingenious way. Once connected, it gives you quite a bit of functionality! The complete list can be found here (just scroll down).

The top ones for me though are easily:

  • The way it connects to your car. It “…plugs into the same port your mechanic uses when you take your car in for service.” and it’s use of the low-energy Bluetooth 4.0 connection to conserve your phone’s battery life is really well thought out.
  • The geolocation of your car is always recorded in real-time. So no need to take a picture of the spot you parked in. The location can also be shared.
  • Accident/crash support. Contacting 911 with your location all the while texting loved ones once help has responded and is on the way, is pretty great.
  • Real-time reporting on engine lights (listing their cause) AND the ability to reset them. To me, this alone is totally worth the price of the service/hardware! $69.95 (!?!)

Check out the video below! It covers everything above and more.

As you can probably tell, I am smitten with this. Just a very, very interesting idea for a service. And it’s the implementation of it, that makes it so intriguing to me.

I could be wrong, but I am pretty sure there isn’t anything like it out there!
—–
Company:Automatic
All video and pictures were taken from Automatic’s own press material.

Interesting Ideas: The LEAP

Saw this making the rounds today. Pretty interesting tech going on here! In a bunch of ways this is where I am hoping personal computing is going: less tactile and more fluid.

I like the idea of computer use being more an extension of natural human movement rather than all of us hunched in front of screens moving our hands repetitively until they ache and degrade.

Anyone out there know if this project is legit or not? They are taking preorders but, to be honest, the price ($75 with shipping) seems to good to be true. Also, I’m always suspect of video demos that could easily be doctored into a “proof of concept” rather than and actual demo of the hardware in use. That and their “Developers” tab is a dead link. Not a good sign.

Anyways, here’s the video. Hit me up on Twitter if you know anything about it! Might just have to order one! :D

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_d6KuiuteIA]

UPDATE: This definitely is legit. CNN ran a bit on it and it’s been featured on just about every reputable Mac site on the planet (and then some). Pretty amazing stuff! Again, as I said above, the content of that video and the price point alone make me want to grab the ole plastic and hit up that preorder page they’ve got! Add in what appears to be a good amount of developer interest and it’s total win-win for us Mac owners!

Writing: My Writing Setup Part 2 – Hardware

I touched upon this in a previous post but, as that post was focused on the software I used, I thought I’d expound a little more on my writing setup from a hardware level and why I chose the setup that I did.

I’ve taken a very minimalist approach to the hardware I use in my writing nowadays. I used to have a 13in MacBook Pro and that was WAY more hardware than I needed for 90% of what I do with a computer everyday. I considered selling it for one of these, but even that seemed like overkill. So when the last iPad came out I was then convinced that I could whittle things down even further, go even lighter, even more portable. So I did what a lot of people in the tech and writing field still consider to be unthinkable: I traded in the laptop for a iPad.

I won’t lie, it hasn’t been the easiest transition but, to be honest, it hasn’t been that bad either. I actually only find the setup to be irritating in the most small and unexpected ways. But the cool part is, is that there are always ways around any issue or hurdle I’ve come across so far. Do I miss my laptop? Sometimes. That’s unavoidable. There are still some instances where I have no choice but to seek out some morerobust hardware to do some heavy lifting. But, in all honesty, it’s been shocking at how much I don’t have those situations pop up.

Bar none the iPad’s been amazingly capable.

So! With out further adieu, here is my current hardware setup for writing (and a ton more)!

  1. An iPad – (2012, 3rd generation)
  2. A stand (TwelveSouth’s Compass)
  3. Apple’s bluetooth keyboard

iPad SetupiPad Setup side view

There are plenty of alternatives out there that I considered, BUT, I already owned a spare Apple bluetooth keyboard and I had no interest in spending the extra cash involved in buying an alternative.

The good news is, purely by circumstance and not experience, I actually ended up prefering my setup to a clamshell-based iPad case for a variety of reasons. Here are the Pro’s and Cons!

PROS:

  1. Because the keyboard isn’t attached, I am not handcuffed to being a set distance away from my iPad. I can sit as far away or as close as I want. It also helps with ergonomics if you have issues with that. Separating the keyboard from the screen really affords a lot of customization. Me? I typically have the keyboard on my lap and the iPad on the stand on the table in front of me. It’s just more comfortable for me that way.
  2. The particular stand I bought allows for some natural adjustment of how the iPad sits on it. So there’s some good angle adjustments you can make to make sure you are not Quasimodo-ing over your screen. The free standing nature of it all gives a great amount freedom to place things where you want. It accommodates you rather than the other way around.
  3. The 2012 iPad’s screen resolution. Yes, I’m sure you’ve heard all about the wonders and spectacle (including unicorns) of the most recent iPad’s screen resolution but, I gotta admit, it’s pretty damn glorious and way nicer on eye strain than the models before it. If you can spare the extra scratch, I highly recommend it. Especially if you plan on spending a good amount of time in front of it. Think of it as an investment in your ever faithful eyeballs. :)

CONS:

  1. Everything’s separate and in individual pieces. No, I’m not crazy. I know I just extolled the fact that separate pieces are my preference. But it’s also one of my setup’s greatest weaknesses. An “all-in-one” setup is easy to grab, throw in a bag and go. It’s definitely more convenient. But in this case I chose my own comfort over ease of use. When you get to your writing location with an all in one setup, you put it on the table, open it and get to work. With my setup, you sit down, take out the stand, unfold and set it up, place the iPad on it, take out the keyboard, turn it on, sync it to the iPad and then get to work. In short, it’s definitely something to consider.
  2. Stand weight. As much as love my stand, the TwelveSouth stand is woefully hefty. Some might argue that the ruggedness is a strength and testimate to the quality of the product. It’s hard to argue against that but, I’d prefer a stand that was WAY lighter and made with the same quality. I haven’t found one yet, but I’m definitely on the hunt.
  3. Battery life. A bluetooth keyboard needs batteries and, in return, crushes the battery life of your iPad as well. So, wireless convenience definitely comes at a price. And packing extra batteries or a charger can definitely be a drag.

So no doubt, there is a good bit to consider and there definitely isn’t what I’d call a silver bullet solution. Like many things, it all comes down to your life and your preferences. For me, my setup definitely outweighs the inconveniences that are packaged within. They suck up mere minutes and only add a little extra weight to my bag. Does it successfully replace my laptop? Yes, for me it does. But please remember that I predominantly write, check email, Twitter, and browse the web. I do occasionally code but not at a rate that would necessitate anything above my memory and a basic text editor. So, in short, this setup works for me, but it may not work for you! Don’t get suckered into the latest round of “ditch your laptop for an iPad” propaganda. It’s a romantic notion for sure, but it definitely doesn’t accommodate everyone’s wants and needs. Not yet anyways.

Hopefully you found this useful! Hit me up up on Twitter if you didn’t or have something to add! I would genuinely love to hear it! I think a lot of folks are curious about this situation. I know I was!

Hope you all had a good week,

Tad